Program

Continuing Medical Education

Jointly Provided by




 

Society for Birth Defects Research and Prevention

2020 Virtual Annual Meeting

 

On Demand CME Modules Available through May 2021

 

Module 1: President’s Welcome, Josef Warkany Lecture, and Robert L. Brent Lecture—Teratogen Update from Dysmorphology to Next‐Generation Phenotyping

Chairperson: Christine Perdan Curran, Northern Kentucky University

(90 minutes, original air date June 25, 2020)

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1. Identify typical dysmorphic findings seen in RASopathies.

2. Use a next‐generation phenotyping tool for digital facial analysis.

Presentations and Speakers

·       POPs: A Plethora of Developmental Effects, Linda S. Birnbaum, Scientist Emeritus and Former Director, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and National Toxicology Program

·       From Dysmorphology to Next-Generation Phenotyping, Karen W. Gripp, A.I. duPont Hospital for Children/Nemours

 

Module 2: Gene Therapy: CRISPR/Cas9 Technology, Breakthroughs, and Ethical Challenges Symposium

Chairpersons: Gloria D. Jahnke, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and Evi Struble, US Food and Drug Administration

(120 minutes, original air date June 29, 2020)

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1.     Summarize the molecular basis of CRISPR/Cas9 genome‐editing technique including off‐target effects and other potential toxicities.

2.     Discuss its applications in the laboratory and whole organism scale to understand pathophysiology of inheritable diseases such as NAD deficiency.

3.     Understand preclinical considerations for human gene therapy products involving genome editing by CRISPR/Cas.

4.     Identify ethical concerns around the use of genome editing to alter somatic and germline cells and the potential societal implications of such individual or inheritable changes.

Presentations and Speakers

·       Introduction to CRISPR‐Cas9 Gene Editing, Jennifer Mason, Clemson University

·       The Use of CRISPR/Cas9 Technology to Study Congenital Malformations Caused by NAD Deficiency, Paul R. Mark, Spectrum Health Medical Group

·       Gene Therapy Products Using CRISPR/CAS9: Applications and Regulatory Considerations, Shana D. Hardy, US Food and Drug Administration

·       Ethical and Governance Considerations of Germline Gene Editing, Eric T. Juengst, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

 

Module 3: Investigation of a Potential Outbreak of Birth Defects Symposium (120 Minutes)

Chairpersons: Sonja A. Rasmussen, University of Florida and Cheryl S. Broussard, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

(120 minutes, original air date June 29, 2020)

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe the ten steps in a field investigation when concern for an increased rate of birth defects is raised.

2.     Describe the critical role played by birth defects surveillance systems to address a possible increased rate of birth defects.

3.     Identify ways to develop interventions to respond to an increase in the rate of birth defects.

4.     Discuss key principles to guide communications with the public when responding to an increased rate of birth defects.

Presentations and Speakers

·       Ten Steps to a Field Investigation of an Increased Rate of Birth Defects, Sonja A. Rasmussen, University of Florida

·       Using Birth Defects Surveillance to Address a Possible Increased Rate of Birth Defects, Peter H. Langlois, Texas Department of State Health Services

·       Developing Interventions in Response to an Increase in Birth Defects, Cheryl S. Broussard, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

·       Communicating with the Public during a Public Health Emergency Response, Glen J. Nowak, University of Georgia

 

Module 4: Keynote Lecture and Agnish Fellowship Lecture  

Chairperson: Elise M. Lewis, Charles River

(75 minutes, original air date June 30, 2020)

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1.     Recognize the benefits and limitations of maternal plasma cell free DNA as a screen for fetal aneuploidy.

2.     Describing underlying reasons for "false positive" cell‐free DNA results and what we have learned from them.

Presentations and Speakers

·       Prenatal Genomic Medicine: Transforming Obstetric Practice and Delivering New Biological Insights, Diana W. Bianchi, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

·       Educating Future Birth Defects Researchers: Opportunities in the Era of Personalized Medicine, Systems Biology, and CRISPER Technologies, Elaine M. Faustman, University of Washington

 

Module 5: Assessing and Modeling Perinatal and Postnatal Exposures to Environmental Chemicals in Support of Human Health Risk Assessment Symposium (120 minutes)

Chairpersons: Laura Carlson, US Environmental Protection Agency and Geniece Lehmann, US Environmental Protection Agency

(120 minutes, original air date June 30, 2020)

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1.     Summarize current approaches that can be used in modeling gestational and lactational exposures to environmental chemicals.

2.     Understand environmental exposures important to infants and children and Identify key uncertainties and data gaps in our understanding of children’s exposures to chemicals from breast milk, formula, and nondietary sources.

3.     Describe the unique metabolic, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of pregnancy and early development and how they are accounted for in different exposure assessments and pharmacokinetic modeling.

4.     Understand methods that may be used to develop risk assessments that can better protect children’s health.

Presentations and Speakers

·       Environmental Chemicals in Breast Milk and Formula: Exposure and Risk Assessment Implications, Judy S. LaKind, LaKind Associates

·       Level of Detail for Pharmacokinetic Modeling During Development: Time or Tissues, But Not Both, Paul M. Schlosser, US Environmental Protection Agency

·       Pharmacokinetic Modeling as a Tool to Bridge In Vitro, In Vivo, and Epidemiological Data in Risk Assessment of Developmental Exposures, Marc‐Andre Verner, University of Montréal

·       Children’s Nondietary Exposures to Environmental Chemicals, Paloma I. Beamer, University of Arizona

·       A Review of Factors Influencing Children’s Exposure Assessment, Geniece Lehmann, US Environmental Protection Agency

 

Module 6: Opioid Use in Pregnancy: Translational Perspectives Symposium

Chairpersons: Christina D. Chambers, University of California–San Diego and Rina Eiden, Pennsylvania State University

(120 minutes, original air date June 30, 2020)

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe known risks for adverse birth and long‐term child health outcomes with prenatal opioid exposure.

2.     Identify epigenetic mechanisms that may be involved in susceptibility and severity of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS).

3.     Discuss successful interventions and strategies for treatment of infants with NOWS.

4.     Describe one successful parenting intervention with m‐health delivery for parents/caregivers of infants or toddlers who experienced NOWS.

Presentations and Speakers

·       Outcomes among Children of Opiate Using Mothers, Elisabeth Conradt, University of Utah

·       A Translational Model of Gestational Buprenorphine Exposure: Effects on the Dam and the Offspring, Susanne Brummelte, Wayne State University

·       Prenatal Exposure to Opioids and Other Substances: What Do We Know about Later Development Outcomes?, Hendrée Jones, UNC Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

·       Modifying an Evidence‐Based Home Visiting Intervention for Mothers with Opioid Dependence, Mary Dozier, University of Delaware

 

Module 7: Pregnancy, Environment, and Child Health: A Focus on Obesity and Metabolic Disorders

Chairpersons: Suzanne E. Fenton, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and Jerrold J. Heindel, Commonweal

(120 minutes, original air date July 1, 2020)

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand the incidence and breadth of obesity in the U.S. and around the world.

2.     Describe the health‐related costs that obesity is causing in the U.S.

3.     Identify many environmental chemicals that may be contributing to the obesity epidemic, and their potential modes of action.

4.     Describe the many ways that obesity is contributing to related health problems in susceptible subpopulations and the importance of reducing obesity in these people.

Presentations and Speakers

·       Endocrinological and Environmental Control of Obesity, Jerrold J. Heindel, Commonweal

·       Environmental Influences on the Childhood Obesity Epidemic, Leonardo Trasande, NYU School of Medicine

·       Effects of Developmental Exposure to Genx on Mouse Offspring: Pubertal and Metabolic Targets, Suzanne E. Fenton, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

·       How Does Prenatal Obesogen Exposure Lead to a Transgenerational Predisposition to Obesity?, Bruce Blumberg, University of California, Irvine

·       The Role of Maternal Obesity and Pregnancy Weight Gain Patterns in Pregnancy and Birth, and Longer‐Term Health Outcomes, Elizabeth Widen, University of Texas at Austin

 

Module 8: Single‐Cell Revolution: Embryogenesis at High‐Resolution Symposium

Chairpersons: Thomas B. Knudsen, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA and Elaine M. Faustman, University of Washington

(120 minutes, original air date July 2, 2020)

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe new methods of single cell transcriptomic analysis.

2.     Identify how single cell transcriptomic profiles can improve our understanding of normal development.

3.     Understand how single cell transcriptomics can be used to characterize developmental disease progression and define precision therapy.

4.     Characterize how single cell transciptomics can facilitate our identification and evaluation of cell specific targets of developmental and reproductive toxicants.

5.     Identify remaining challenges in application of these new technologies.

Presentations and Speakers

·       Teratogenesis at the Single‐Cell Level: Opportunities and Challenges, Thomas B. Knudsen, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA

·       Development and Disease at Single Cell Resolution Development and Disease at Single Cell Resolution, Malte Spielmann, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics

·       What scRNAseq Is Now Telling Us about Embryology, Sean Megason, Harvard Medical School

·       How Single‐Cell Profiling Data Can Be Applied to Improve Children’s Health, Elaine M. Faustman, University of Washington

 

 

Target Audience

Physicians and Advance Practice Professionals involved or interested in the causes and prevention of birth defects and developmental disorders and the research related to such.

Competencies to be addressed

Practice Based Learning and Improvement
Medical / Pharmacotherapy Knowledge
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Professionalism
Provide Patient‐Centered Care
Employ Evidence Based Practice
Utilize Informatics


Activity Director

Sonja A. Rasmussen, MD, MS
Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida College of Medicine

Registration

Access to the On Demand CME Modules is included in the registration fee for the Society for Birth Defects Research and Prevention 60th Annual Meeting. Physicians, Physicians Assistants, and Nurse Practitioners may register at the following link: Registration Link

Please select Full Virtual Meeting Registration or One-Day Registration (select the original date of the module(s) you wish to view) and use Discount Code founded1960 to get 30% off the registration fee shown.

Accreditation
accme

Physicians: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through a joint providership of USF Health and the Society for Birth Defects Research and Prevention. USF Health is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians

USF Health designates this live for a maximum of 14.75 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Physician Assistants: PAs may claim a maximum of 14.75 Category 1 credits for completing all the modules in this activity. NCCPA accepts AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society.

Nurse Practitioners: AANPCP accepts certificates of participation for educational activities approved for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM by ACCME accredited providers. APRNs who participate will receive a certificate of completion commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Disclosures

USF Health adheres to ACCME Standards regarding commercial support of continuing medical education. It is the policy of USF Health that the faculty and planning committee disclose real or apparent conflicts of interest relating to the topics of this educational activity, that relevant conflict(s) of interest are resolved, and also that speakers will disclose any unlabeled/unapproved use of drug(s) or device(s) during their presentation(s). Detailed disclosure will be made at the beginning of each presentation in the modules.

How to Claim Credit

Instructions on how to claim credit will be emailed to you after viewing each complete CME Module. You must claim credit for each individual CME Module. If you do not view a CME Module in entirety you will not receive the email with instructions for claiming credit.

Commercial Support

There is no commercial support for this activity.

Disclaimer

The information provided at this CME/CE activity is for continuing education purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the independent medical/clinical judgment of a healthcare provider relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient’s medical condition.

Equal Opportunity and ADA

USF is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action / Equal Access Institution.

CME Questions / Concerns

Contact Charmagne Branch-Price, Education Coordinator, Office of Continuing Professional Development USF Health, cbranch@usf.edu